How did you convince your doctor that you have endometriosis?

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It is no secret that most doctors, including OBGYNs have limited knowledge and experience in diagnosing endometriosis. This puts a lot of responsibility on patients to diagnose and convince their doctor that they might have endometriosis. Convincing the doctors is essential to establish a healthy relationship and asking for further referrals. But many doctors still resist agreeing that the patient might have endometriosis despite all the evidence. So this is a common question by endo warriors “how did you convince your doctor (OBGYN or Family) that you have endometriosis?” Please share your experience.

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Call them out on bs. I think of my partnership with my doctors as a relationship. So I stand up for it, assess the compatability, determine its needs amd efgorts, most importanly I advocate for myself. Just as I would in a romantic relationship. I’m clear with my needs, wants, and and humanly disrespect that has been give. I wouldn’t say I “convinced” my doctors. Some, most, aren’t convinced. But I did make them question their own understandmemt and egoistical beliefs.

I’m incredibly direct (when not in freeze mode from trauma). I’ll say things like, “What is your short and long term goal for me as a patient?” “That doesn’t align with my needs.” “Either we’re going to collaborate on this relationship and you’re going to have to step up to take your job and responsibilities seriously, or this isn’t going to work out/file complaint and contact direct manager.” “What’s your endo/ [certain illness] philosophy.” “I understand your worries and concerns for me as a patient. I understand this is what you were taught and live with. Regardless, you’re lacking to understand me and make me, as the patient, feel safe and understood. *Present information of my case again*” “Are you able to provide and care for me with this complicated case?” “Do you have the proper tools, knowledge, and will to assist and help me on my journey?” Etc.

It’s not convincing. Conving is manipulative and leaves space for ot to be possibly incorrect. I believe every person who has questioned endo to this point does have it. Regardless of diagnosis because of it’s dramatic delay.

It’s understandment, and willigness to see the truth regardless of how hard it may be to accept such an impact.

If the patient has to do it then so does the doctor.

 

 

 

  • Leslie Alatorre answered 1 month ago
  • last edited 1 month ago
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I didn’t ever convince any doctor that I had it or that it was the cause of my pain. I went to 14 doctors in 18 months and all but the last 3 said either it wasn’t Endo, or that it could be but there was no point in surgery and there was nothing that could be done, or a had to have a radical hysterectomy and excision wasn’t necessary. I had uterine polyps, multiple fibroids developing an through my endometrium, Endo on my USL and fibrosis bonding pretty much everything together and strangling a ureter. Thank God for Dr. Eugenio-Colon referring me to Dr. Ioana Marcu. She basically told me my own life story. I didn’t need to convince her. It was amazing. I love her so much. Going back to original gynecologist for follow up and she still told me I made a terrible mistake keeping my ovaries. She didn’t seem to own that I’d seen every doctor in her clinic but it wasn’t until I found Nook doctors that I was truly believed. Only surgery convinced them I every had Endo.

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After 2 years of begging for help I finally started yelling at my gyno and he agreed on a hysterectomy to remove chocolate cyst.  I had to yell to get him to agree.  He found stage 4 and retired 3 days later at a large Seattle hospital.

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